Creating unique New Zealand journeys

     

Destination New Zealand

New Zealand is unlike any other place on earth. New Zealand can be divided in 27 regions, which stretch more than 1,600 kilometres across two main islands. Each destination is distinctive in character, and with the country being so compact; you can easily visit several on your holiday.

North Island

South Island

National Parks

Active volcanoes, island sanctuaries and history top the list when visiting New Zealand’s North Island. The subtropical Northland region of New Zealand stretches upwards from Auckland to the very top of New Zealand.

In the beautiful Bay of Islands you can take a boat cruise or swim with dolphins. Auckland is New Zealand’s largest city -  a whole region full of things to see and do.

Not far from Auckland you will find the Coromandel, with its pristine beaches and native forests, one of New Zealand’s most popular and best-loved holiday destinations.

The North Island is also home to the Hawkes Bay, one of the country’s leading producers of wine. And a visit to New Zealand won’t be complete without stopping in Rotorua - the home of fascinating Maori culture, hot springs and boiling mud pools. The Ruapehu region is defined by the three volcanoes. The centrepiece is the snow-capped Mount Ruapehu, alongside the two smaller cones of Mount Ngauruhoe and Mount Tongariro. Situated at the southern end of the North Island is Wellington, New Zealand's capital city, renowned for its arts, heritage, culture and native beauty.

Wairarapa is an hour’s drive north of Wellington. Visit the vineyards of Martinborough or Cape Palliser, the southernmost point of the North Island.

New Zealand’s South Island hosts the purest natural landscapes you’ll ever experience. It is here where you can explore glacial valleys, alpine lakes, and majestic mountains.

Located at the top of the South Island, Marlborough is New Zealand’s largest wine growing region. Situated at the top north-west of the South Island, is the Nelson region with Abel Tasman National Park.

The West Coast is a wild place of rivers and rainforests, glaciers and geological treasures.

Fiordland is one of the most dramatic and beautiful parts of New Zealand. Canterbury stretches from ocean to the Alps, and is land of plains and peaks.

A must-see is New Zealand’s highest peak, Aoraki Mount Cook. And then there’s New Zealand's second-largest city Christchurch, known as ‘The Garden City'. In February 2011, Christchurch was hit by a huge earthquake. Much of the central city with its classic neo-gothic architecture was destroyed. But it remains a beautiful city, where innovative shops and businesses are springing up as the city rebuilds.

Dunedin is a region of unique landscapes and fascinating cultural history. Head further south, and you join the Southern Scenic Route, a must-do of the South Island that follows the wild coast down to Invercargill and then north-west to Manapouri and Te Anau.

Queenstown is one of New Zealand’s top visitor destinations and if you come to the region you’ll understand why. World famous for its iconic scenery, friendly people, golf courses, wineries and the ultimate outdoor activities, you'll never be short of things to do in Queenstown.

New Zealand’s national parks cover more than 30,000 square kilometres. They contain the most treasured natural heritage, forests, wildlife and landscapes. New Zealand's 14 national parks are overflowing with beautiful, natural scenery and activities.

Te Urewera National Park is most famous for its remote, rugged forest and lakes. Tongariro National Park is a place of extremes and surprises, featuring active volcanoes. Whanganui National Park offers tramping tracks through wild lowland forests and river trips down the mighty Whanganui. Egmont National Park is dominated by the 2518m high volcanic peak of Mt Taranaki (also known as Mt Egmont).

Abel Tasman National Park features the Abel Tasman Coast Track Great Walk, known as the finest coastal walk in the country with golden beaches and sculptured granite cliffs surrounded by diverse native forest. Kahurangi National Park covers the West Coast at the top of the South Island. Nelson Lakes National Park offers tranquil beech forest, craggy mountains, clear streams and lakes. Westland Tai Poutini extends from the highest peaks of the Southern Alps to the rugged and remote beaches of the wild West Coast. Mount Aspiring National Park at the southern end of the Southern Alps is a walker's paradise and a must for mountaineers.
Fiordland National Park is one of the great wilderness areas of the Southern Hemisphere. Paparoa is famous for the Pancake Rocks, near the settlement of Punakaiki. Arthur's Pass National Park is a park of contrasts, with dry beech/tawhai forest in the east and luxuriant rainforest on western slopes. Aoraki/Mount Cook is New Zealand's great alpine park with the highest mountains and the largest glaciers. In Rakiura National Park you can explore pristine beaches, sheltered inlets, and coastal forest, and see seals, penguins, kiwi, weka and many other birds. It makes up about 85 percent of Stewart Island/Rakiura.